Thursday, February 7, 2008

There is no such thing as Singapore Noodles

Dear Readers, I would like to clear this up once and for all... there's no such thing as "Singapore Noodles".

Actually I wouldn't get so worked up if not for the fact that it taste horrible. I was rather intrigued when I first came across "Singapore Noodles" during the initial months when I'm in London and curiousity got the better of me and I decided to give them a try. Big mistake. The noodles, when cooked, looks (and taste) like rice vermicelli. In fact, a tastier alternative would be Sainsbury's in-house instant noodles that cost a mere 8p per packet. Just boil the (Sainsbury) instant noodles for two minutes and throw it into the wok after draining it. For a healthier version, you can opt for fresh egg pasta (just over a pound per 500g) at Tesco or Sainsbury.

Prima Taste have decided to jump into the bandwagon with a "Singapore Curry" as well. Like the noodle version, I've never heard of "Singapore Curry" when I'm in Singapore as well. But I love the chicken curry back home and the picture on the packet looks real promising. Furthermore, I've got no problems with Prima's stuff as yet. Well, I got one in the end and will try it out one of these days.



Just a sidenote, if you were to visit Singapore one day, do check out our national favorite, the "Hainanese Chicken Rice", which can be found at every coffee shop, hawker centre and foodcourt.

Guess what? It has got nothing to do with China's Hainan island. In fact, it's only found in the Malayan Straits region (Peninsula Malaysia and Singapore).

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9 comments:

london soon said...

“星洲炒米”is a popular dish in Hong Kong and like you, I have to explain to my HK friends there's no such thing as a Singapore Noodle. It's rice vermicelle fried with capsicum/egg/bean sprouts and curry powder!

Back in Singapore there's this -Hong Kong Mee, vice versa, HKgers find it amusing, no such dishes here:)!

C K said...

Haha... I've heard about Hong Kong Mee as well back home. Never tasted it though...

kyh said...

After reading london soon's comment, then I think the Singapore Noodles are meant to be 'singapore beehoon', which uses rice vermicelli as well.

Just like people often get confused that French fries originated in France!

C K said...

Wonder why they call it 'french fries' though. But recalled some time back when the States had some disagreement with France, they started calling french fries as 'victory fries' instead. lol

kyh said...

The Americans termed the fries Freedom Fries after the strong opposition of Iraqi War by France. LOL!

Linda M Haden said...

BTW, Hainanese chicken Rice is based on the style of cooking they for chickens in Hainan island itself. When the hainanse chefs immigrated to Singapore, they brought their cooking techniques with them and developed the dish that you see today.

siaoeh, another singapo lang in UK said...

the Singapore noodles in UK originated from Hong Kong's version (aka fried beehoon with curry powder), brought over by the immigrants who crossed the continents to set up restaurants and takeaways here. Been amused/enraged for years until I finally plucked up enough cheek to ask my local chinese takeaway how the dish came about. :-)

C K said...

@siaoeh, another singapo lang in UK

Woah, that's a mouthful. Anyway, thanks for the clarification. I'm surprised that the takeaway actually entertained your query, you must have been a regular customer :p

But there's no curry powder in the noodles, is there?

siaoeh, asl in UK said...

@ck
yup. curry powder galore! expect that same curry powder flavour in Singapore fried noodles, Singapore fried vermicelli, Singapore fried rice... only in UK of course.

as for why they entertained my cheeky question... well, what's a little secret sharing between friends? :-) yes, underneath the constantly shouting out 'salt, vinegar?' 'open, wrapped?' facade, they are very nice people. I get free BBQ char siew sauce and more prawns in my chow mein and they get the last minute temp worker if their staff go MIA.